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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 12

Posted by grosa , Jun 23, 2015 - - - - - - · 1,438 views

Back to the hall table.
Picture 1, 2, 3, shows the pedestal after I pulled off all the tape. At this point it has been stained and 2 coats of pre cat lacquer have been sprayed and sanded.
Picture 4, 5, I pre fit the overlay and make marks at the bottom for alignment.
Picture 6,7, I use 1/4" MDF on both sides to protect the wood from the clamps. I am only applying the overlay on one side at a time.
Picture 8, 9, I do the same on the other side.
Picture 10, 11, This is what it looks like after they are all glued on.
Picture 12, 13, 14, 15, after it is all sprayed, it's time for assembly of all the parts.
Picture 16 - 29, Here is the table all assembled at the shop. I also made a chalkboard to match the two tables and I will show you pictures of it when I take the final install pictures. Bothe tables and the chalkboard are going in the same room. We will be installing these pieces on the 30th.
The last picture of the table gears show the date the gears were made.
While I was making these tables Diego was making a round desk. I will show you one picture of the desk. If I get enough interest on this blog I will post a bunch of pictures on how he made it. Just comment if you are interested in seeing the pictures. Here is the desk with the granite installed. The last picture is the hall table with the granite.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 11

Posted by grosa , Jun 16, 2015 - - - - - - · 1,168 views

It's time to get back to the conference table and finish the arm rail. The granite is done and Ron and I made the paper template.
It was dark in the shop that day because it was raining all day.
Picture 1, I setup the router and tramel to cut the outside edge of the rail. I did it in three passes with a single flute bit to remove material quickly.
Picture 2, a close up of the first cut.
Picture 3 a close up of the final cut.
Picture 4, a bird's eye view of the out side cut.
Picture 5, It was so dark I had to use a flashlight to set up for the inside cut.
Picture 6, I used the same process on the inside cut as I did on the outside.
Picture 7, I check it with the paper template.
Picture 8, time to sand the edges. I use a DA to sand the outside and a flex block to sand the inside with 80 then 120.
Picture 9,10, now I need to cut a chamfer on the outside radius of the arm rail. To do this I will use a 3" raised panel cutter with an oversized bearing on a 3 1/4 hp router.
IF YOU DO NOT HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH LARGE BITS AND ROUTERS PLEASE DO NOT TRY THIS!
Picture 11, using a large bit and router puts hair on your chest :)
Picture 12, this is what the cut looks like.
Picture 13-22 after sanding all the parts to 150, it took a while. Ron and Bill stained and clear coated all the parts for both tables except the pedestal for the hall table because it needed some extra TLC.
Picture 23- 25 they also clear coated all the metal gears.
We delivered the conference table yesterday and today we went back to screw on the arm rail after the granite was installed.
These final pictures are of the completed conference table.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 10

Posted by grosa , Jun 09, 2015 - - - - - - · 1,263 views

Making the base.
Picture 1, this is the Sapele lumber I am using for the base. It is prepared on the jointer, planer, wide belt sander.
Picture 2, It's cut into the size I need.
Picture 3, some of these pictures are a little blurry because the camera was not on the right setting but you will get the idea. After cutting the 45's on the ends I use a Hoffmann machine to pull the miters together. This is a Hoffmann machine.
Picture 4, the 45 on the end of the board.
Picture 5, 6, the board in the machine
Picture 7, pull down on the lever and the router goes up creating the dovetail groove. Thi is what it looks like.
Picture 8, I do the same on the other side and end up with this.
Picture 9, 10, 11, 12, I insert a plastic butterfly wedge and hammer it down to pull it together.
Picture 13, when it dries I cut a piece of 3/4" sapele plywood and glue the frame to the plywood, flush on top so I can glue a piece of Sapele veneer on top so you can't see the glue line between the hardwood and the plywood.
Picture 14, showing the veneer after it was pressed in the vacuum bag using Titebond 2 glue.
Picture 15, it is trimmed with a router.
Picture 16, the trimming bit I use is a tapered bit with a square plastic bearing it works great and will not scratch the material, and when you go into a screw hole it will leave a bump for sanding not an indent that you have to repair.
Picture 17, close up of the bit.
Picture 18, after trimming.
Picture 19, This is the bit I will use to route the edges in three passes.
Picture 20, this is the router I used.
Picture 21, first pass.
Picture 22, second pass.
Picture 23, 24, lastpass.
Picture 25, The next level up is the burl veneer is pressed on a 6" piece of plywood then cut into 1 1/2" strips, 45's are cut on the ends and glued to make a rectangle. The top of the 1 1/2" strip is capped with a solid piece of Sapele and I rout a cove on all four edges.
Picture 26-34, this is what it looks like all together.
Now it's time to make the 1/4" overlay that goes on the pedestal.
Picture 35,36,37, back to the template I made at the beginning I pin nailed 1/2" x 1/2" mdf to the template to act as another template to cut the overlays. In certain areas I moved it in 1/2" to make it look right. Diego is the master veneer man so I had a lot of help from him. I traced the template on the 1/4" mdf
Picture 38,38,40, we position and hand cut the rough size on the veneer.
Picture 41, Diego changes the blade to 124 tooth blade.
Picture 42,more hand cutting and cutting the seams on the table saw.
Picture 43,44,45, more cutting seams.
Picture 46,47,48, more cutting.
Picture 49, Finally! We glue the veneer to the 1/4" mdf with Unibond 800 this glue is made for vacuum bags and sets up in one hour.
Picture 50, when it comes out of the bag this is what it looks like.
Picture 51, time to sand.
Picture 52 this is what it looks like after sanding.
Picture 53,54,55, Time to cut the overlays on the pin router.
Picture 56, after sanding all the edges I taped it in place so you can see the overall look I am trying to achieve. The rest of the pictures are all different angles of the table. Now we need to sand it all with 150 and get it all stained and cleared. Yes, the customer wants a dark brown stain.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 9

Posted by grosa , May 28, 2015 - - - - - - · 732 views

Now that the pedestal is made it's time to make the skirt platform for the granite.
Picture 1,2, it is made from 3/4" birch poplar core plywood with a build up.
Picture 3- 8,now I glue on the gear style dental I made at the very beginning of this job. The dental is ripped at 2" wide and glued all the way around.
Picture 9 after sanding it goes on the pedestal.
Picture 10, time to make the arm rail to go along the perimeter with a 1/2" overhang. This is the board and it will be planed down to 1 3/16" thick x 3" wide.
Picture 11,12, after machining this is what I got.
Picture 13, I cut the 45's on the arm rail and pre fit them.
Picture 14, I cut out some table clamps so I can glue up the corners on the arm rail.
Picture 15,16,17,18, The table clamps are screwed to the table off center and they are positioned so when you pull the handle they pull your workpiece in a certain direction. the two on top are pulling away and are tightened first and the one at the bottom ( the return) is pushed towards the first one which applies pressure. Because you screw it tight to the table it stays in place, no other clamps needed.
Picture 19, here is a look at the joint after drying and sanding.
Picture 20,21,22,23, We got the veneer in today for the overlay that is going on the pedestal for this table.
Picture 24,25,26,27, shows the table with the arm rail.
Part 10 will be building the base for this table.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 8

Posted by grosa , May 27, 2015 - - - - - - · 826 views

I need to finish the pedestal for the hall table.
Picture 1,2,3,4 gluing the return for the side pieces.
Picture 5, the parts I glued up for the face frame for the pedestal need to be sanded.
Picture 6, after sanding this is what I ended up with.
Picture 7, here is a close up of the joint.
Picture 8,9, it's time to mount the template I made to the face frame material, there are two of these.
Picture 10,11, now that the face frame will be cut on the inverted pin router.
Picture 12, after cutting on the router.
Picture 13-17, dry fit the parts to make sure it all works together.
Picture 18,19,20 time to glue up the inside ones first.
Picture 21,22, time to cut and dry fit the bottom.
Picture 23,24, now I glue up the outside ones.
Picture 25, Here is a better look at the sides with the returns befor I glued it to the frame.
Picture 26-29, once all that dries for about 1 hour it's time to glue the other frame on. It's over 100 degrees in the shop so I need a little help from Ron and Diego to get it glued up before the glue dries.
Picture 30-33 after drying the face frames are sanded to the sides flush. 2 hours of sanding.
Picture 34,35, time to glue the bottom in.
Picture 36,37, using a small piece of scrap I test fit different angles and a 45 degree works the best.
Picture 38. here is the piece I will use for the top.
Picture 39, I cut the 45's on the chop saw.
Picture 40,41,42, dry fit the part. The gap will be fitted with a small piece to form the flat return on the inside.
Picture 43,44, time to glue it in.
Picture 45, Lots of sanding. I had to make a tool modification to sand in the tight corners on my multi tool.
Picture 46, this is what it looks like after sanding. Now it's time to dry fit the gears I welded together.
Picture 47- 51 here is what it looks like with the gears in place.
Picture 52, the last thing to do on the pedestal is glue in some nailers to attach the skirt platform for the granite.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 7

Posted by grosa , May 24, 2015 - - - - - - · 658 views

Picture 1. Making the template to make the full size cutting template for the hall table.
Picture 2, after cutting out the template this is what it looks like.
Picture 3,4,5, I lay it out on some 3/4" poplar core plywood and cut it out on the sliding table saw.
Picture 6, I use the template to cut out two identical parts to keep it symmetrical.
Picture 7,8,I cut it on the inverted pin router.
Picture 9, the two parts cut out, I know it will be symmetrical.
Picture 10, the two parts I just cut out are screwed onto 3/4" plywood making sure everything is nice and square.
Picture 11, now I cut it on the pin router.
Picture 12, and this is what I end up with.
Picture 13, with all the templates I made I could make a funky kitchen table.
Picture 14,15, Time to cut up the material for both these parts.
Picture 16,17, the wood is prepared for gluing, one side of each board on the jointer and parallel cut on the table saw.
Picture 18, and this is the dry fit before gluing.
Picture 19 the parts are all glued up. There are two of these. While that is drying I will start on the base of the table.
I cut up some 1/8" bendply 24pcs. 8" x 32" and Diego and I resawed 4 pieces of Sapele the same size. They were all put in the vacuum bag to be glued on a form.
Picture 20-25 the base parts being glued on the form.
Picture 26, after drying the parts were cut to with on the table saw.
Picture 27,28 The parts are dry fitted to the cutting template.
Picture 29, time to lay out the gears.
Picture 30,31, the gears need to be welded in place with tabs for mounting. The gears are cast. You can mig weld cast but the trick is you have to preheat the cast with a torch first. I am using .035 wire and my CO2 gauge is on 35. because these gears are thick my mig welder is set on high amps and a high feed rate.
Picture 32-39 here is the cast gears welded together.
Picture 40- 43 the welds after they have been cleaned up.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 6

Posted by grosa , May 23, 2015 - - - - - - · 498 views

Picture 1 Through 7 Getting the wood ready to make the arm rail for the table top. For the best look it's important to get all the parts out of one board.
After all the parts are cut up with a circular saw they need to be prepared for gluing. All the boards are jointed
then they are parallel cut on the table saw. All the angles are cut on a sliding table saw.
Picture 10, after cutting everything is pre fitted and checked.
Picture 11, The rail will be glued together using pinch dogs in two pieces so I can run it through the planner and sand it through the wide belt sander.
Picture 12, this is the joint before sanding.
Picture 13,14,15, before gluing the rail let's make the substrate for the tabletop to lay on.
Picture 16,17,18, Let's glue up the rail.
Picture 19, I sand the joint with 80 grit in a circular motion to fill in any gaps with sawdust and glue.
Picture 20 shows the joint after it is sanded with 80 grit.
Picture 21, after running it through the planner I screw on a snipe block on each end to protect the joint board from any snipes.
Picture 22, After running it through the wide belt sander I check the joints.
Picture 23, gluing the two center joints.
Picture 24,25, now it's time to sand the entire face with a straight line sander.
Picture 26,27,28,29, Lets look at the sanded joint.
Picture 30,31. This is a sample of the granite that is going inside the arm rail.
Before the arm rail can be cut we have to wait on a template from the granite shop so we can cut the rail to fit the granite.
While we are waiting we will start making the hall table, thats part 7.

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Photo

Cigar factory furniture part 5

Posted by grosa , May 15, 2015 - - - - - - · 529 views

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE MANY YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH A TABLE SAW PLEASE DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME OR WORK, YOU WILL GET HURT.
It's time to connect the corbel to the turning and the end piece.
Picture 1, I clamped a piece of plywood to the table saw on an angle.
Picture 2, I made a sled to ride the plywood and hold the parts in place while cutting.
Picture 3, the finish height of the blade is 3/4" high.
Picture 4, is showing the exposed blade on the back side of the part, It can getcha.
Start with the blade height at 1/16" and move it up in 1/16" increments with every pass.
I made a video of this as I was cutting it. https://youtu.be/v77ZSFT1c3k
The next 7 pictures show the end pieces after they were cut on the table saw.
Picture 12, 13. 14, shows the corbel mounted on the sled to be cut the same way.
Picture 15-26 shows the parts dry fitted together. All the parts need to get sanded before any of them get glued together.
Picture 27, this is how the parts will line up.
Picture 28, three holes are drilled in the center post and three matching holes in the corbel.
Picture 29, this is how I glued the corbel to the turning.
Picture 30, to attach the end part of the corbel and keep it lined up with the corbel I cut a piece of scrap to keep both sides in line and go around the turning.
Picture 31, 32, 33, This is how I attached the capital to the turning.
Picture 34-38, This is what it looks like all glued together. It still needs a little more sanding.

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Cigar factory furniture part 4

Posted by grosa , May 14, 2015 - - - - - - · 533 views

Making the corbels.
Picture 1, the wood is prepped like before with the jointer, planner and wide belt sander.
Picture 2, The core of the corbel will end up being 2 3/8" thick. I started with 12/4 material.
Picture 3, the wood is glued up.
Picture 4,5, a little trick I use when I rough cut material on a bandsaw is a washer. If I want to rough cut the material 1/4", 1/8", 1/2" bigger than the template I use a washer to draw the line very quickly
Picture 6,7, I screw the template on the back side of my material and draw my 1/4" offset line for the bandsaw.
Picture 8, then I bring it over to the inverted pin router. I set it up with a 1/2" up spiral 2 flute carbide bit and a roller 1/2" pin.
Picture 9, 10 the first cut is made past the center point.
Picture 11, 12, the template is then removed, the part is flipped over, the pin is lowered and the other side is cut flush to the template.
Picture 13, 14, there is a 1/32" offset so the part needs to be sanded, this is done on all three parts.
Picture 15, Now it's time to make the outside parts to the corbel. The wood is cut and prepped like before.
Picture 16, the template is made for the 3/4" overlay parts.
Picture 17, 18, the wood is glued up.
Picture 19, I draw my offset lines.
Picture 20, I cut them on the bandsaw.
Picture 21, I attached the template to the wood with screws on the back side and cut them on the inverted pin router.
Picture 22, 23, after cutting the parts I pre fit then to make sure they look correct.
Picture 24, 25, now I will route a cove on the overly parts of the corbel.
Picture 26, time to rout a chamfer on the outside of the 2 3/8" core.
Picture 27, 28, 29, is showing the parts after they have been routed.
Picture 30, 31, time to glue all three parts together.
Picture 32, 33, 34, while the corbels are drying I need to add the 1/2" detail to the center column.
Part 5 will be connecting the corbel to the round turning and the end piece.

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Cigar factory furniture part 3

Posted by grosa , Apr 29, 2015 - - - - - - · 562 views

Picture 1. Rough cutting the 1 1/2" sapele for the second part of the base.
Picture 2 Gluing up the boards after they were prepped for gluing on the jointer and the planer just like the first part of the base.
Picture 3, 4, 5 Planning the three parts to a uniform thickness.
Picture 6 Gluing two parts together for sanding.
Picture 7, 8, 9 Running the two parts through the 37" wide belt sander. The widest part was 35".
Picture 10 Gluing on the last part.
Picture 11 Cutting off the extra material leaving roughly 2" bigger than I need.
Picture 12 Gluing the top and bottom of the base together.
Picture 13, 14, 15 Putting the two parts in the vacuum bag will bond the two parts together much flatter and quicker. The bag produces 1200 lbs. of pressure per square inch and presses it flat to the mdf. It will be completely dry in 3 hours. While that is drying I will glue together the center post for the corbels.
Picture 16 This is the mdf mock up of the center column.
Picture 17 After cutting up all the parts, 3 @ 3 1/2" wide and 3 @ 4 1/2" wide x 25" long with a 30 degree miter. I place them on a cart face up and put masking tape at the top, middle, and bottom then I turn them over.
Picture 18 I put glue in the mitters and brush it out. Then I start on one end and roll it up, stand it up and pull the tabs of the tape tight.
Picture 19, 20 I put on two ratchet straps to add pressure and let dry.
Picture 21, 22, 23 After sanding this is what the part looks like.
Picture 24, 25 shows how it sits on the base.
Picture 26, 27, 28 Now it's time to trim the base. I will be cutting off all the extra wood and leaving 1/2" to trim flush with the top part. I use a metal cutting bit because it leaves a cleaner cut.
Picture 29, 30 Showing the cut.
Picture 31 -37 Routing the edges flush. I use a router to take off 3/4 of the material then I use an inverted pin router to finish it off.
Picture 38-41 Now I change from a 1/4" bit to a 1//2" bit to trim the edge to 90 degrees before profiling the edges.
Picture 42 This is the router bit for the first profile.
Picture 43 First profile done.
Picture 44 This is the second profile.
Picture 45 The bottom profile done.
Picture 46 This is the top profile cutter.
Picture 47 - 50 Top profile done.
Picture 51, 52 Showing the 1" forstner hole to recess the bolts on the bottom.
Picture 53, 54, 55 Here it is. Base with the corbel post and the all thread.
Picture 56 - 61 Now it's time to lay out the corbels in cardboard to get some sizes.

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