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I am working on a landscape project now that has a challenge I haven't met before - the foreground is in shade, the middle ground is in a lighter level of shade, and the background has levels of very deep shade - typical black/white cutting just don't "cut" it (pun intended) - after all the cutting is done my thoughts on trying to deal with this gradient of shading is to use progressive levels of stain.  The wood is Walnut and I'm thinking of using a Minwax Dark Walnut stain applied in multiple coats with a fairly dry sponge until I get the "shade" I want - then move on from there with the finishing..  I have not done this kind of thing before so am wondering if others have some experience and advice that would give me a better (and easier) result.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Jay

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Thanks for the replies - I'm close to finishing the cutting now and will start doing some experimenting - two things I am going to try - one will be stain applied very sparingly in multiple coats to try and get the shades I want - the other will be very watered down aniline dye applied in the same way.  Will let you know how (or if) it turns out ...... have really got my fingers crossed that this doesn't turn into one of those hard lessons in how not to do something ......

 

Thanks,

 

 

Jay

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Jay, I have tried it on carvings in the past and found that it works to a degree but is very subtle. It might work better on a larger area, mine were all small areas.

Good luck with it though, can't wait to see it.

Don R

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If you watch this video by "The Woodwhisperer" at right around 31 minutes, he does the hot sand shading.  I remembered this video when Jim mentioned hot sand in his post above.  I video is about inlaying with a router, but the hot sand thing should work the same, maybe.

 

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/router-based-inlay/

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Thanks again for the replies - that hot sand idea is intriguing - I watched the video - pretty neat - that guy is seriously talented - but I'm afraid the technique won't work with my landscape piece just because of the nature of the piece - but it did get me to thinking about maybe resurrecting the woodburner and see how that might work as well - regardless of the method used tomorrow is the big day .... feeling reasonably confident ..... kinda ..... sorta ...... so still have my fingers crossed .....

 

Thanks,

 

 

Jay

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The hot sand works great as does the wood burning with the proper tip.

I repaired a Giraffe carving recently and had to recreate the spots. I used stain with a light touch and let it bleed into the grain.  Definitely practice on scrap of the same wood before you commit. 

I used a Q-tip wit with a little stain and built it up until it looked good to me.

The nose was missing so I made a new, it went to our local thrift shop.

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Edited by Rolf

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