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    barb.j.enders

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/20/2024 in all areas

  1. Just finished this beautiful Russ Beard pattern of the Viking Girl, I double stacked them on 3mm Baltic Birch Plywood, cut entirely with a Niqua#1 Pin Less Blade, now to clean up, oil and frame. My wife Loraine has claimed these two as her own, who am I to argue.
    26 points
  2. Pattern by toymaking plans.com
    24 points
  3. GPscroller

    Young Love series

    Love this series by Charles Dearing. All double stack 1/8 BB ply. Cut with Sawbird #3 ultra reverse and Niqua 3/0 spirals. Soda one is 13 X 14 430 cuts, Swing is 11 X 14 388 cuts, Walking Her Home is 8 1/2 X 14 221 cuts.
    19 points
  4. I’ve been a Waylon fan for almost fifty years. I was at the Opryland Amusement Park in Tennessee around 1975 and heard him play, not really knowing much about him, and have been a fan since.
    19 points
  5. Ribbiting Frogs pattern by Jaeheon Yun and found in his book "20 Minute Scroll Saw Puzzles". I used 3/4" Poplar approximately 5 1/2" x 9". Cut on the Pegas Scroll Saw using a Pegas #5R MGT blade. After lightly sanding, dipped in diluted Shellac, and a second sanding and dipping. Comments welcome.
    18 points
  6. My latest piece. Many hours went into this one. 11 x 14 x 1/8 inches BB. Spiral blades.
    18 points
  7. DickMira

    Maltese Puppy

    This project started in a reverse order to the usual format. This beautiful piece of mahogany was given to me by a friend. It was 13' x 10" x 1 3/8" thick. I was thinking of various subjects when I decided to check out the patterns in the Scrollsaw Village Patterns Section. When I saw the fantastic "Maltese Puppy" by superb pattern designer, Jim Blume, I knew this would work very well for this project. The wood was sanded, the edges were routed, and the pattern was attached with 3M spray adhesive. Pilot holes were drilled and the scroll work was completed with spiral blades. The carving was completed using a Foredom Rotary Power Carver and the fur was produced with multiple passes with the top edges of three different sizes of columnar bits. The puppy was colored with Minwax Polycrylic Finish and artist acrylic paints. The background was finished with multiple coats of polyurethane finish. Thank you Jim, for the beautiful design of this pattern. Dick
    17 points
  8. Eight Standing Miniature Birdhouses patterns by the late Diana Thompson. I used Poplar for the birdhouses and Eastern Red Cedar for the birds except for the eight one, I used Lacewood. Cut on the Pegas scroll saw using Pegas #3 and #6 Super Skip blades. After sanding, a dip in diluted Shellac and another light sanding. Comments welcome.
    17 points
  9. Got the finish done this morning. Two generous coats of shellac with a thin coat of beeswax/mineral oil over top. Over 120 pieces. Janet Square design. Woods used: Spanish Cedar, Quilted Maple, Poplar, Rainbow Poplar, Cherry, Pine, Aspen, Bamboo, reclaimed Elm, Walnut, Spruce. Mostly cut with MG #5. Some #1 & #3's. You can see the progress pictures in Work in Progress - Next on the Saw.
    16 points
  10. My high school English teacher always had the senior class memorize the first 18 lines of the prologue of The Canterbury Tales. Written in Old English, it is the story of a group of pilgrims on their way to Canterbury Cathedral. I included in the frame the line which translates, "Then folk long to go on pilgrimages" along with some nods to some things mentioned in the prologue, the rain, the wind, the sun, and singing birds. I'll be surprising Mrs. Hudson, my English teacher, with it soon. It is around 11" X 14", 3/4" alder wood, painted with acrylic craft paints with a spray clear coat.
    16 points
  11. munzieb

    Alex Fox Mountain Train

    Alex, Thanks for the great patten. Some areas were a challange but it was a joy to cut. I did add some bridges when I thought some pieces would become too floppy. I actually stack cut this to make 2. No harder than cutting one. 1/8" BBPW on 3/16" backer. Shellac and Gloss Lacquer finish.
    16 points
  12. Wichman

    Switch cover plate

    Steve Good pattern 1/4" Elm. #1 Polar for the details, #3 Polar for the outside.
    15 points
  13. This Sandhill Crane pattern is by Steve Good. I used 1/4" Baltic Birch plywood for all the pieces. Cut on the Pegas Scroll Saw using Pegas #1 MGT blades. After a light sanding, dipped in diluted Shellac and another light sanding. Comments welcome.
    15 points
  14. A couple I recently finished up. Standard 3/8" ply from Lowes, frames are scrap lumber ripped down. Stains are Minwax "Honey" and "Natural". The car came from the pattern library here, and The Shadow was a pic I found online. Filled in his scarf with some red acrylic paint that my daughter wasn't using (she's switched to oils). Wanted to put "Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows." but figured out pretty quick that the text would have to be incredibly tiny to fit on there. Maybe if I save up my allowance and am able to get a deeper saw....
    15 points
  15. alexfox

    Cactus set

    I planned to make a cactus, but couldn't decide which type to make, so I decided to make a set. I also did it in such a way that it was possible to change their places: any cactus fits any pot. Project consists of 2 parts, you can take out cactus of a pot and change it. Approximate size is 3 x 6 inches each. Cactus consists of 2 layers, pot - 4 layers. Video of making Cactus project Cactus patterns
    14 points
  16. GPscroller

    Latest ones

    Latest ones. Angel is Ridgeback Wood-Lamp pattern, double stack 1/8 BB ply. 164 cuts with #3 ultra reverse and #3/0 spiral 11 X 17 inches. Fishing rules by Jim Blume on BB ply 8 X 8. 70 cuts with #3 ultra reverse.
    14 points
  17. I have a couple friends that love baseball and puzzles, so for their birthdays I’ve been making them a puzzle from a Norman Rockwell baseball themed illustration. This year is #10 in the series. The locks around the edge add a little challenge rather than a straight edge to identify the outside "frame" of the puzzle.
    14 points
  18. We had lot’s of rain lately which is not too good for the golf courses, so made a few items in the shop to keep busy. The crucifix was for one commission work but decided to cut two at once.
    13 points
  19. munzieb

    F-16 Fighting Falcon

    After finishing my complicated train project, I needed somthing quick to cut. I rambled through some of the clip art I had and found the F-16. I only had to add a few bridges. Pretty easy to cut. Quite a bit of info on the F-16 in wikipedia. It's been in production since 1974 and over 4600 produced. Over 25 countries operate the aircraft. Local interest for me. Locheed Martin moved the production of the aircraft from Texas to Greenville SC at Donaldson Field in 2019, just south of the city. (a few miles from me) Side note of interest: I was sitting on the back deck and this bird landed on the Hummingbird feeder. Its a Rose Breasted Grosbeak. It is rare in our area. He was heading north from South America. Pretty bird.
    13 points
  20. The steer head was my first real scroll project using my 90's era, single speed, pin tpe blade scroll saw. The RN is my favorite, its a Steve Good pattern that I modified to include the recipient's initials. I used scrap from pallets and other sources, mostly pine. My latest is the nativity scene, Pictured is a pine practice cut, I did a few in popular for some friends. my cutting was halted in January with my stroke. I am waiting on my new saw, Dewalt 788, to arrive this week. ready to get serious!
    13 points
  21. It took approximately 300 years, but I made my first candle arch. So. Much. Trial. And. Error. Debated painting vs spray lacquer up until the very end. Finally laziness won out, and they got the lacquer. I'm pretty sure the base is cherry. More photos Pattern: Regu https://www.ebay.ca/itm/262775400771
    12 points
  22. keefie

    Engagement Picture

    Just finished this picture for an engagement present. The pattern was kindly made for me by Grampa (as usual a very nice pattern) It has been cut from 4mm Baltic Birch ply and finished with 2 coats of sanding sealer followed by 2 coats of acrylic lacquer. All comments welcomed. Now its time to start my next project - a PBY Catalina cut from a pattern kindly shared by Munzieb (thank you Munzieb for the pattern).
    12 points
  23. Our daughter was here with family last Thanksgiving. She admired the Jewel Box I had made a few years earlier. Guess I’ll make her one.
    12 points
  24. munzieb

    Jewelry Box

    Normally I would have put this into the "Other Woodwork" but I did do some scrolling on this project. I I did the cutout for the 2 draws in the front and the funiture feet also. My wife said she had enough black Jewelry boxes and wanted to try and paint a pattern on white. The frame is 1/2" poplar. I've made enough of these that it went pretty quick. I used my I-Box jig to cut the sides. I did cut out the draw dividing piece in case one of the draws got stuck. Steam bended the top with 1/8" BBPW and used Titebond III to glue it down to the top. I always build a second joint box section for the top. Mark out the radius on the ends and cut the correct angle on the front and back on the scroll saw, then assemble and glue the pieces. I used this to clamp (many clamps) to connect it all together. Lots of spray white paint and my wife used her one stroke painting technique on the top and inside of top. Back to regular scrolling for my next project.
    11 points
  25. This Sandhill Crane pattern is by Steve Good. There are two patterns and I call this one "B". I used 1/4" Baltic Birch plywood for all the pieces. Cut on the Pegas Scroll Saw using Pegas #1 MGT blades. After a light sanding, dipped in diluted Shellac and another light sanding. Comments welcome.
    11 points
  26. Springtime brings lots of birds to our backyard. I made this for my wife who is the bird lady of Moorpark!
    11 points
  27. Jim McDonald

    Wedding gift

    A family member (25F) is getting married in August and wanted something to honor deceased grandparents and others. Steve Good had a pattern for doll furniture that I reworked to make a flat seat. Forstner bit to make shallow candle holder and a friend lasered five names for me. Not sure how they will be displayed--individually or as a group.
    9 points
  28. Charlie E

    Cool Hand Luke

    Paul Newman as Luke Jackson/Cool Hand Luke. Cut in 1/2” alder. ”I can eat 50 eggs.”
    9 points
  29. Wichman

    Got er done.

    Just finished this one
    9 points
  30. I modified the spice rack for size, thickness of material and removed the middle shelf to make room for taller items. 5/16" Elm, #1 Polar blade for all interior cuts and the veining on the top cross piece. #3 Polar blades for the outside cuts.
    8 points
  31. I have shown this before but it is sitting close by and I thought it really looked like spring. And I have a real urge to make some birdhouses of I purchased some cedar boards a couple days age. Little late for this years brood of babies but start for next spring.
    8 points
  32. barb.j.enders

    Rubber Duckie

    This will be a birthday gift for my sister. She has a collection of rubber ducks. I thought I would add to it. Woods used: Poplar, Aspen, Tigerwood, Paduk and Walnut. Cut with #5 mg blade. Beeswax butter for the finish.
    8 points
  33. 7 points
  34. My 7 year old grandson asked me to make him a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle portrait. I found an image combining all four including their weapons that i used for a segmentation pattern. If you're not familiar they are, left to right top to bottom, Leonardo, Donatello, Michelangelo, and Raphael. Not sure how long they've been around but my son was a fan over 30 years ago.
    6 points
  35. Lots of construction going on around us these days (yay, progress...?), so its harder to hear the owls and coyotes at night, but we still have plenty of little critters, and the hummingbirds remember where my wife keeps the feeders. Oh, and let us not forget the Texas springtime thunderstorms....
    6 points
  36. Hawk

    New Hawk in the shop

    Well, needless to say the saw came home with me. But here's the rest of the story...... When I got there the guy selling it (late 30's I guess) met me at his parents house, where the saw was. They had it out in the driveway. It looked like it was brand new, no marks on the saw top at all The guy selling it told me he bought it to do craft shows, but couldn't get the saw to "cut right" so he put it in the garage and bought a new Dewalt 788. He got the saw from an older lady who told him her husband bought it new, used it for about a month then passed, it had been setting in the shop since then. First thing I checked was the triangle piece (pic) to ensure the corners were still sharp, not rounded, thanks @OCtoolguy for that. As you can see it's looks new to me. All plugged in, took me a bit to get the blade in the lower mount, got it in there, applied the tension lever, turned it on. The thing took off about a gazillion miles an hour, things were slapping and making noise like it was flying apart. I'm glad I spent last night watching videos on this saw as I knew immediately it was way out of adjustment. So I released the front tension, adjusted the rear tension, it was way off!. Speed was full on fast, turned that down to just up from the slowest setting. Rear tension set, front tension set, turned it on.... Like a different saw, turned the speed up to about 1000 ram's and what a real pleasure. Extremely quiet, the "mom" commented it was quiter than her sewing machine. The guy selling it said "wow" it never ran like that. So, I turned it off, paid the guy and loaded it up! Smiling all the way home.
    6 points
  37. What needs to be done Dave is provide ample air circulation around all sides of the wood. The best way to achieve this is either lean the boards against a wall or work bench so air can circulate or stack and sticker the boards. That entails placing stickers or sticks between each board with weight on the top board. Leave the boards alone until they acclimate to your shops humidity or lack of.
    6 points
  38. alexfox

    3D geometry

    My second 3D geometric project, consists of 50 pieces. Each piece is not large, so you can use scraps of wood to make it, project size is about 4 inches diameter, I used 1/8 inch birch plywood. Video of making project Pattern - https://alexfoxua.etsy.com
    5 points
  39. One old trick I did when I had a shop that I did not heat (as I live in Michigan as well) is I had an old refrigerator that did not work and I rigged the switch to keep the light on and I used an incandescent light bulb and it keep the glue and paint warm ware as not to freeze them and they could be used any time . I only cost pennies to leave the light on and old refrigerators can be gotten for free, and you can get a smaller one so it doesn't take up a lot of space and can be used for shelving for tools and other things that you would store in the shed as well heated or not. Or even a cooler with a light in it.
    5 points
  40. Kevin can afford a shop like that, but I could not afford the scraps cut out for the windows. He makes a bunch each year off of scrolling-- or he married into a bunch of money!. Maybe he makes it off his good looks. Either or whichever I do not have. But good on him!
    4 points
  41. look for some alex snodgrass videos on youtube. he is the bandsaw master and can explain it far better than i can.
    4 points
  42. With spring comes working in the yard, as we get older it sometimes is a pain, literally, to get up. Here is a new pattern from Al Baggetta, his "Umph Bar" a devise to help you back on your feet. 7/16" Elm, #1 Polar blades for the details, #3 Polar for the outside cuts. Detail "leaf" from a Steve Good Pattern.
    4 points
  43. After seeing Ron Johnson's posting of toys I had to try my luck. Seeing his posing of the F-16 fighter jet I decided to make one for a nephew who is a pilot in this aircraft. Probably not the easiest pattern to choose for my first attempt, but I think it turned out OK. I am pleased with it, hopefully my nephew is and you are too. Jerry
    4 points
  44. kmmcrafts

    Hawk scrollsaw

    Tension lever is at the front circled in the picture. The part at the back is to adjust how much tension is applied.. The back part of the saw under that tension adjuster back there will be a wedge shape piece..That wedge is supposed to be very pointed and almost sharp.. That would be one of the telltale signs of how much use it's had. The wedge over time will sort of get a more rounded edge on it and be a indication if it's rounded over it may have been used more than you might think. But new wedge is are available for like $15 I think.. and you can even just put it on a flat surface and sand each side until it is pointed again. The front tension lever is another wear point. It has a tension cam underneath the arm or inside the arm that can wear out but again.. those two parts are still used today on the newest saw made and readily available and not too pricey. Anything else that wears on these saws is pretty much available at any hardware store.. That's why I love these saws. I've rebuilt my Excalibur when it had around 250 hours on it.. at just over 500 hours on it now it is getting loose again.. My Hawk has around 500 hours on it and nothing has been done.. even the wedge is still pointed.. this is how well built they are.. LOL Some people have issues with the clamping systems on some of these saws as they are more picky with clamping and tension etc.. so keep that in mind.. Some pick right up on it while others struggle and give up.. If you can get the hang of that without much trouble this saw would out last you and any grandchildren too, LOL They run really quite smooth however you should be aware that they do have a couple harmonic balance spots on the speed dial that they get a little shaky but turn the dial up or down a smig and they're smooth.. You can call Bushton Manufacturing with the serial number and they can give you a lot of info on it such as what year etc.. any records of it being in for a rebuild or service.. From what I can see of the saw it's not been used much I don't think.. I seen the thing pop up on Marketplace.. if it were closer to southern MI I might have checked it out.. I have two 26 inch saws but wouldn't mind selling off one of them and getting the smaller 20" like this one.. They take up a large area as the stand is part of the saw so they're big and heavy.
    4 points
  45. Joe W.

    Finishing Cedar?

    Last summer I helped a friend build a cedar privacy wall for a deck. My friend told the homeowner - once you touch it with stain or paint you have to keep touching it (in a few years) to make it look the same.
    4 points
  46. Wichman

    Basswood

    These are ornaments cut from 1/8" basswood (hobby lobby) it cuts well and as you can see, will take details without falling apart.
    4 points
  47. kmmcrafts

    Off Topic Finishing??

    I felt this would get seen more here rather than the other forum topics so hopefully I’ll get some good input on this. I built two of these bucket gardens, one for a friend and one for myself. To do over I’d have just used treated lumber or cedar. But now that they are built I’m wondering what would be a decent finish to help preserve the standard construction 2x4’s. Originally I thought I had some leftover exterior paint but when I open the cans they are mostly dried up so I originally thought I could buy cheap lumber and use up my old paints I had laying around. Now that I’ve got to buy something is why I say to do over I’d just use treated lumber. Since this is a garden thing it’s obviously going to be outside and getting watered etc. Not looking to make it last forever but I don’t really want to just leave it raw either. Thinking about cheap options is someone else’s leftover paint from the restore places or some paint that was mixed incorrectly so long as it’s exterior and not interior but thought maybe I ask here as maybe someone has a better idea. Don’t really care too much about looks or colors really within reason, I mean I don’t really want fluorescent bright pink or totally ugly colors . Anyway thoughts on something to use or am I on the right track with just using an exterior paint and call it good. Nothing in this type of setting is going to last forever other than metal so I know it’s going to rot at some point.
    4 points
  48. Here it is, finished and ready to hang on the wall. BTW, my wife has claimed it and it is to hang on our wall. Since I last posted about it, after many side-tracks and disruptions, I have encased it in clear epoxy, sanded and clear-coated it with lacquer. The wood is 3/8" mesquite and I used Pegas MGT blades, mostly #3. The finished product is roughly 7-1/2" H x 7-3/4" W. It was a fun project to cut although it took many hours. I had not originally planned to do the epoxy but the words at the bottom were fragile. There are several single bridges between the H, the N, the 3 and the 6. They broke and I had to glue them back together. You can probably see it if you look close enough. Now, with the epoxy, nothing is going to break. I will share the pattern if anyone is interested.
    4 points
  49. Hey Everyone! in this fun Scroll Saw Project Video, we make another custom Compound Cut Keychain for the NC Woodworkers! This keychain will be part of a raffle and all the money raised will go to a good cause! And, whoever wins this keychain will get a FREE Custom keychain from me with the name of their choosing! Hope you all like the video! #ArtisanPirate
    4 points
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